biography

Jacqueline Ross enjoys a unique and varied career performing on both modern and period instruments.
Born in New York, she began her studies under the legendary Joseph Fuchs at the Juilliard School, continuing studies in contemporary music with Saschko Gawriloff in Germany, and baroque violin with Lucy van Dael in Amsterdam. Her solo recordings, which have been met with wide critical acclaim, include the complete Sonatas and Partitas of JS Bach:

“Elegant, thoughtful phrasing, imparting inner life to the music, with a strong sense of the character of each dance…Ross’ close, well-matured relationship to the music bears rich dividends”

Gramophone

Her most recent project, the Complete Works for Violin and Fortepiano by Franz Schubert, were recorded for Naxos Records in partnership with Maggie Cole.

 

DuoFinchcock

Jacqueline is also a devoted teacher, and is currently Professor at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. She is regularly invited to give masterclasses internationally, which include the Curtis Institute, the Mozarteum, the Paris Conservatoire, and conservatories throughout Europe and the Far East. She has also adjudicated on many major violin competitions, including the Menuhin, Salzburg Mozart, Leopold Mozart, Isang Yun, and Louis Spohr International Violin Competitions, among others.

Her research into style and performance has been supported by the Dutch Arts and Humanities Research Board, The British Council, and the London Centre for Arts and Cultural Exchange. She has recently been awarded an AHRC – Centre for Musical Performance and Creative Practice (CMPCP) Visiting Fellowship based at Cambridge University, to further her research on early 19th century performance practice, and to prepare an edition of Schubert’s Trockne Blumen Variations, which she has recently recorded.

She performs on a GB Guadagnini violin made in Turin in 1777, which was financed for her with kind help from NW Brown.

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“Ross is constantly alert to the music’s roots in dance and rhetoric, striking an ideal balance between light-footed articulation and seriousness of intent.”

THE STRAD